Dungeon Gallery

Fantasy scenery, generally used for tabletop wargames.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

December 2002

I took another break and came back to begin painting the pieces. An all-grey dungeon is boring. I wanted color. The walls were drybrushed grey, but I wanted another color for the cobblestone floor. A deep brown base with a highlight like red clay was what I chose. It turned out great!

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

For the moment the dungeon is clean. There's no rubble, moss, vines or dripping water. I'll make small items that can be placed in rooms to represent that stuff, but I don't want to be locked into too much yet.

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Post by Terrainosaur »

You can see how a figure fits into these larger-scale rooms and looks better. That's an i-Kore elf I'm using to show the scale. I think with each batch of pictures, I'll use a miniature from a different company.

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Post by Terrainosaur »

This is a gigantic hall, probably used for eating. (The walls aren't really curved, that's just the picture.) I made two fixed doorways, since it seems to me any very large room would have more than one. That reminds me, I have cast doors separately. If a room needs another door, I can place a door against a wall. That's easier than determining how many doorways each room has and being stuck with it forever.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

This U-shaped room was designed so that I could put either a corridor or a set of stairs into the slot. The problem is, none of those I've built fit! I'll have to make some pieces that will fit into there. They won't look much different than the rest, just be a fraction of an inch narrower.

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Post by Terrainosaur »

Another experimental room. When you read books with maps of dungeons, you'll sometimes see areas with lots of little rooms clustered together. These are usually living quarters for several minor villains or maybe extra rooms for a more senior-level villain (like his bedroom, study, etc). Making a bunch of very small rooms to be placed next to each other later is impossible, so I built a whole piece with a bunch of small rooms. I'm not sure how useful this will be, but it isn't hard to make and it looks good.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

I wanted a chamber where people were to speak to the king. When you walk in, you're in an open area with pillars lining the walls. In front of you are steps leading up to the next part of the room. That's where the king's throne would be. There are two short pillars where there would normally be fires burning, but the dungeon is long abandoned.

But this isn't one room, it's two! One room would have been too big to store, so I built it in two pieces. The second level (where the elf is standing) is an inch higher off the ground. I might build two more rooms with similar dimensions but different interiors so that I can mix-and-match.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

February 2003

All those rooms have to be connected somehow. Here are a bunch of long halls. My halls and rooms don't fit next to each other perfectly, but once I do some pictures of the whole dungeon you'll see it doesn't much matter.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

More long hallways.

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Post by Terrainosaur »

Short hallways.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

Another small room and a short hallway.

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Post by Terrainosaur »

Two corners: one an L-shaped corner and one a T-shaped intersection. I suppose I need several more of each so I can have more options when setting up, but for the moment I'm going to live with these two. I added archways to make the piece stronger.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

March 2003

I've played around with dungeon scenery for a bit and decided it should all be modular. I want to be able to place stuff in a room as the adventure requires. Some people buy piles of coins from Reaper or Dwarven Forge and paint them gold. They look unrealistic to me because they aren't sparkly and the coins are way too big. Remember the scale is about 1/72. Even if you took a US quarter and shrunk it 1/72, it wouldn't be big enough to sculpt. The Dwarven Forge ones are about the size of frizbees! So I bought some Liquitex Concentrated Artist Color Liquigems Gold (a very long title for metallic gold paint), poured it out and let it dry. Then I painted a couple layers over a Dwarven Forge pile of coins too. You can see how sparkly and eye-catching they are.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

April 2003

This is the first piece to really take advantage of the three-dimensional aspect of my dungeon. It's a set of steps going down into dark water. It's effectively like a caved-in section or a dead end, but it lends a dark, dangerous atmosphere to the dungeon. I painted the walls progressively darker as they go down. I smoothed the walls with plaster to match the bases of the other pieces. The water is Woodland Scenics' Realistic Water.

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Terrainosaur
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Post by Terrainosaur »

August 2003

As an accessory, I built a pit of burning coals during the summer. It's easy to make. The base is made of cobblestone bricks, giving me a rough surface to start with. Then I added some ballast (little round bits of rock) and tallus (broken, irregular bits of rock) to form the coals. I painted them white, then red, then drybrushed black over the top to give the impression they're hot.

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